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Skin, Hair and Nails > Hair

We human beings dispensed with the need for thick body hair long ago in our evolutionary history although some remains though often in the wrong place.

Our head hair provides protection from the potentially damaging effects of ultraviolet light on the skin of the scalp, and depending on where we live, it also provides some insulation against the cold although hair in general has less of a protective or insulating role for us today.

The fact that we still have head hair (or at least most of us do when young) may be due to its importance in sexual attraction.

Anatomy

The hair is divided into the hair root and the protruding hair shaft.
The root or bulb (bulbus) under the skin is thicker than the hair shaft, which together with the underlying dermal hair papillae are responsible for the nourishment, development and growth of hair. A dermal sheath of connective tissue surrounds the whole hair root and together these form a hair follicle.

The shaft of the hair; the part of the hair that can be seen above the scalp consists mainly of dead cells pushed out of the bulb that have turned into keratins and binding material, together with small amounts of water and the hair shaft also contains fats, pigment (melanin), small amounts of vitamins, and traces of zinc and other metals. Hair also contains water which, although it makes up only 10-13% of the hair, is extremely important for its physical and chemical properties.

Is your hair straight or curly? This determined by the shape of the hair shaft cross-section i.e. hair that is more round will be more straight, whereas hair that is more oval will be more curly.

Hair Care
As with your skin, your hair is dependant on the good health of your body and when your diet and lifestyle is good, it shows in your hair making it thicker and more lustrous.  To care for your hair:
  • Generally washing head hair every 1 - 3 days is sufficient to keep it clean
  • Regular trimming to remove split ends
  • If you have frequent bad hair days, try applying oil to your hair, leave it in for a while and then shampoo as normal and this is usually enough to restore texture and shine.
  • Hair care and removal product reviews

 

 



Index
 Acne
 Argan oil
 Blemishes
 Causes of hair loss
 Ceramides
 DHT and hair loss
 Eye lines & Eye bags
 Exfoliation
 Hair
 Hyperpigmentation
 Retinol
 Skin care
 Stretch marks
 Nails
 Top Skin Care Tips


 
 
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Disclaimer:
All Information is provided for educational purposes only and not intended
to be used for any therapeutic purpose, neither is it intended to diagnose,
prevent, treat or cure any disease. Please consult a health care
professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
While attempts have been made to ensure the accuracy of this information,
The Health Information Network does not accept any responsibility for any errors or omissions.

ęCopyright 2014 The Health Information Network