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Minerals & Nutrition > Zink

Zink is one of the most important minerals needed for our everyday metabolism and it is found in almost every cell. It stimulates the activity of approximately 100 enzymes, which are substances that promote biochemical reactions in your body. Zinc supports a healthy immune system, is needed for wound healing, helps maintain your sense of taste and smell, and is needed for DNA synthesis. Zinc also supports normal growth and development during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence.

We need zinc for:
  • It's antioxidant properties
  • protein synthesis
  • wound healing
  • the development of the reproductive organs
  • prostate functions and male hormone activity
  • governing the contractility of muscles
  • blood stability
  • maintaining the body's alkaline balance
  • normal tissue function
  • digestion and metabolism of phosphorus
  • Regulation of the oil glands
  • collagen formation
  • a healthy immune system
  • bone formation
  • Maintaining the proper concentration of vitamin E in the blood
  • Increasing absorption of vitamin A
Lack of zinc may cause
  • delayed sexual maturity
  • prolonged healing of wounds
  • white spots on finger nails
  • retarded growth
  • stretch marks
  • fatigue
  • decreased alertness
  • susceptibility to infections like colds and influenza
  • Loss of taste and smell
  • Acne
  • Hair loss
  • High cholesterol levels
  • Impotency
  • Infertility
  • Prostate problems.

Liquid Zink Nutritional SupplementDietary sources of Zinc
Zinc is found in a wide variety of foods with oysters contain more zinc per serving than any other food, but red meat and poultry provide the majority of zinc in Western diets. Other good food sources include beans, nuts, certain seafood, whole grains, fortified breakfast cereals, and dairy products. Zinc absorption is greater from a diet high in animal protein than a diet rich in plant proteins. Phytates, which are found in whole grain breads, cereals, legumes and other products, can actually decrease zinc absorption.

To Much Zinc May be Toxic
Zinc toxicity has been seen in both acute and chronic forms. Intakes of 150 to 450 mg of zinc per day have been associated with low copper status, altered iron function, reduced immune function, and reduced levels of high-density lipoproteins (the good cholesterol). It is important for individuals taking over 20 milligrams of zinc to be under the care or supervision of a health care professional who will monitor for adverse health effects.
 




Minerals Index
Minerals and Human Health
Why We Need Mineral Supplements
Mineral Nutrition of Coastal Cultures In Pre-Historic Times
Minerals And Chi
The Thesis of Body Mineral Balancing
Ionic Versus Colloidal Minerals
Doctors Mistakes
Minerals & Trace Minerals,
A Clarification of Definitions
Mineral Facts
Minerals from Sea Water
Individual Minerals A-Z
Boron
Calcium
Chromium
Copper
Zinc



 

 
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