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Herbs >Mullein (verbascum thapsus)

Also known as Aaron’s rod, Our Lady’s flannel, velvet dock, wild ice leaf or blanket herb, Mullein is a very distinctive plant, with large leaves growing mainly close to the ground and a tall spike, which can reach heights of six feet or more, on which its flowers grow. Romans would dry the spike and dip it in tallow to use as a torch. Mullein is traditionally attributed with warding off evil spirits and in classical history, Ulysses took mullein to protect himself against Circe.

Mullein is most useful for clearing the lungs of excess mucus. A mullein tea is easy to make and quite effective for this purpose. Simply add a handful of dried leaves and flowers to 1 litre of boiling water and allow to steep for 10 minutes. This can be sweetened with honey according to taste. This tea is also said to control asthma when taken on a daily basis.

Mullein syrup is a bit more difficult to make, but is more effective for congested lungs. Chop 1/2 cup of leaves and flowers into small pieces and place into a pot with 2 1/2 cups of water. Cover and bring to the boil, then allow to simmer for ten minutes. Strain, then return the liquid to the heat and simmer gently until it is reduced to 1 1/2 cups. Add 2 cups of brown sugar and stir until the mixture is well blended, being careful not to let the mixture burn or boil. Store in glass bottles. This should be taken in 2 teaspoon doses for adults and 1 teaspoon doses for children up to 4 times a day.

Eardrops of infused mullein oil will heal earache and soothe itchy ears. Bruise 1/4 cup of mullein leaves and flowers and cover with 1 cup sweet almond oil. Place this mixture in a jar and leave in a sunny or warm position. Shake thoroughly 3 times a day for 10 days, then strain and bottle. Store in the refrigerator. After placing a few drops of the oil into the ear, cover the ear with a warm facecloth for best results. This oil is an effective dressing for skin problems such as ulcers, sunburn and wounds, also.

The emollient and astringent qualities of mullein make it an effective treatment for haemorrhoids. Make a poultice by steeping 10 grams of leaves in 1/2 cup of boiling water for 20 minutes and apply to the affected area.

Other uses:
Because of its healing effect on the lungs, mullein is often a key ingredient in herbal tobacco. A good herbal tobacco can be made by combining one part mullein with one part a mixture of aromatic herbs such as mint, rosemary, thyme or chamomile. The herbs should be mixed together, chopped into tiny pieces, then rubbed between the hands until they are well-blended. A little honey mixed with water can be added to the herbal mixture to add flavour and make a more mellow smoke. Spread the mixture onto a tray and leave to dry for a day or two until it is dry enough to burn evenly.

Growing mullein:
Mullein can be grown either from seed sown in Autumn or Spring, or from root cuttings sown in late winter. It prefers well-drained or even dry soil in the sun. As it will freely self-seed, it is considered a weed in some parts of the world, and is subject to restrictions in Australia. The whole plant is gathered when flowering and dried for medicinal use. Alternatively, the flowers can be gathered separately and used fresh or frozen.




Index
Quick Reference
Alfalfa
Aloe Vera
Arnica
Asafoetida
Betel Leaves
Bishop’s Weed
Blessed Thistle
Burcock
Cascara Sagrada
Cardamom
Chamomile
Chaparral
Chicory
Cinnamon
Comfrey
Coriander
Curry Leaves
Dandelion
Damiana
Echinacea
Euphrasia
Fenugreek
Garlic
Ayurvedic Garlic
Ginger
Aurvedic Ginger
Ginko Biloba
Ginseng
Gotu Kola
Guarana
Henna
Holy Basil
Hoodia Gordonii
Horny Goat Weed
Hyssop
Isapghula
Kalonji
Kava
Lavender
Liquorice
Mullien
Sage
Sandalwood
Sarsaparilla
St Johns Wort
Tee Tree
Thyme
Tribulus
Turmeric

 
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All Information is provided for educational purposes only and not intended
to be used for any therapeutic purpose, neither is it intended to diagnose,
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While attempts have been made to ensure the accuracy of this information,
The Health Information Network does not accept any responsibility for any errors or omissions.

ęCopyright 2014 The Health Information Network