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Herbs > Ayurvedic Herbs and their Healing Power > Coriander
By Dr. Satish Kulkarni

The colloquial name for coriander is dhania, kothmir or kothimbir and its botanical name is Coriandrum sativum. Coriander is a small, erect and attractive plant. Its smell and taste are mouth watering. The herb has many branches, which are smooth. Leaves are compound, thin and very tasty which are commonly included in day-to-day-Indian cookery. Fruits are green when fresh and brownish yellow when ripen. Both have a spicy fragrance and are used in common Indian spices. Stem, leaves and fruits add to taste and flavor of food in addition to their medicinal value.

The part of the world, which regularly cultivates coriander, is India, China, Malaysia, Thailand, the US and European countries. Coriander is rich in vitamins and minerals. It has secured a place in recent macrobiotic philosophy (fighting with disease through substantial change in diet) also. Coriander contains calcium, phosphorous, iron, few vitamins from Vitamin B-complex group and Vitamin C. This is the reason why it is freely advised in any condition related to avitaminosis. In conditions like scurvy, beriberi, P.ulba and other conditions related to vitamins deficiency the regular use of coriander may help improving condition fast.v
The leaves of coriander help improving digestion. They help in stimulating hunger to patients who are anorexic. Fresh juice is an herbal tonic. Buttermilk enriched with fresh leaves/juice of coriander + Asafetida + Cumin seeds + rock salt is digestive, nutritious and convalescence improviser. Routinely it is taken after supper and/or dinner in India. Coriander helps stomach in its daily activities and helps relieving distention in addition. A juice with few other ayurvedic remedies is a recommended treatment for nausea, hyperemesis including hyperemesis graviderum (i.e. morning sickness), colitis including ulcerative colitis and liver disorders.

Dry fruits of coriander are used in treatment of diarrhea and dysentery. Whole night soaking of dry fruits in water and drinking that water in the morning has proven effects on acid peptic disease problem. In dry and fresh both the forms, coriander reduces acidity.

In any type of fever, coriander adds to relief by inducing urination in a natural way. An ayurvedic boiled mixture prepared out of buttermilk, curry leaves, cumin seeds and coriander is included in diet of a patient who is suffering from fever helps in reducing fever and supplying readily available calories to patient who is anorexic due to pyrexia. Drinking this mixture when it is hot helps in reliving accumulated cough in respiratory tract. A decoction of coriander seeds with few other herbals is also a very good option.

One ayurvedic school has suggested use of coriander in typhoid. Few ayurvedic practitioners had given trial in small pox case and had claimed results. However, the question is nonexistent now because small pox is irradicated from most of countries.  Few say, it helps in reducing increased cholesterol level. Ancient ayurvedic textbooks i.e. sanhitas have recommended use of coriander in menorrhagia i.e. profuse bleeding during menses. A decoction of coriander seeds is used for treating this condition.

In shalakya tantra, (ayurvedic ophthalmology and above neck problems) a branch of ashtang ayurved mild decoction of coriander is recommended for eyewash. It gives relief from burning sensation of eyes and relieves pain.

To summarize, coriander is very commonly, worldwide available herb. It is used as a fresh spice as well as medicine. One can safely use it without medical advice in day-to-day problems like indigestion, cold-cough etc. In problems other than these, it can be used under an ayurvedic expert’s supervision.

For further information on Ayurveda and/or questions please Visit India Herbs For Genuine Ayurvedic Medicines and Nutritional Supplements or contact Dr. Satish Kulkarni




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Alfalfa
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Asafoetida
Betel Leaves
Bishop’s Weed
Blessed Thistle
Burcock
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Kalonji
Kava
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Mullien
Sage
Sandalwood
Sarsaparilla
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Tee Tree
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Tribulus
Turmeric

 
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