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Herbs > Chaparral (Larrea divaricata)

Chaparral is not one of the more common herbs in New Zealand. It may be necessary to visit a specialist herbal shop in order to obtain it. It is a blood-purifying and antiseptic properties which makes it a helpful herb.

Healing uses:
The widest use of chaparral is for blood purifying. Expelling toxins from the blood to improve general health, of course, but there are many specific benefits to it. People who work with chemicals, such as photography or industrial chemicals, on a regular basis will find it helpful. A variety of mild complaints – headaches or breathing problems, for instance – may be caused by a build-up of chemicals in the blood, and once the chemicals are expelled, these complaints will be eliminated. Some more serious conditions can be caused by the presence of toxins in the system. Sufferers of arthritis, rheumatism, sinusitis and bursitis may find the condition significantly alleviated after blood purification. It can ease the withdrawal symptoms when quitting smoking or drinking by removing the nicotine or alcohol from the body more quickly, and also eliminating chemicals associated which cause cravings. It is also excellent for eliminating a build-up of chemicals from processed foods before embarking on an organic lifestyle.

Blood purification using chaparral is a lengthy process, but it is well worth. On the first evening, place 1 teaspoon of chaparral leaf into a mug and pour 1 cup of hot (not boiling) water over it. Leave to stand overnight, then strain in the morning and drink the liquid before consuming anything else that day. Do not discard the chaparral leaf, but cover again immediately with hot water. Leave until the next morning, then strain and drink the liquid again. Once more, cover the same chaparral leaves with 1 cup of hot water, and drink the liquid the next morning. On the third morning, discard the leaves after drinking the liquid. That evening, re-start the process with fresh chaparral leaves. Repeat the three-day cycle seven times – drinking the chaparral extract every day for 21 days in total. It is important to follow these instructions carefully, as the concentration of the chaparral extract is being varied daily according to a specific formula.

A milder chaparral tea can be used for smaller scale detoxification. Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 teaspoon of chaparral leaf and leave to stand for 10 minutes. This is excellent when having a bad reaction to some food, or to speed recovery after over-indulging in alcohol. It is also said to hasten the elimination of LSD from the body, which will prevent flashbacks from occurring.

As well as its blood purification properties, chaparral is an excellent anti-fungal and antibacterial herb. Athlete’s foot will be alleviated by soaking the feet in a double strength chaparral tea (2 teaspoons of chaparral leaf to 1 cup of hot water). A paste of chaparral and slippery elm powders mixed with aloe vera gel will further improve this condition.

Athlete’s foot, along with other fungal infections, such as nail fungus, ringworm and vaginal yeast infections, can benefit from chaparral taken internally. A mixture of 4 parts chaparral powder, 2 parts garlic powder, 1/2 part powdered ginger and 1/2 part cayenne powder taken three times daily in 1/2 teaspoon doses with a large glass of water is an excellent remedy for these infections. This mixture will also make an excellent antibiotic for throat or chest infections.

Medical tests have indicated that chaparral could inhibit the growth of tumours, and therefore may be extremely beneficial in the treatment of cancer. This use if the herb is very much in the experimental stage, although some herbalists speak very highly of this application of it.

Cautions:
Heavy users of drugs, including caffeine and alcohol, may experience headaches and nausea when using chaparral as a blood purifier. It is not recommended to use chaparral to withdraw from drugs without professional guidance.

People who have kidney or liver problems should consult a professional herbalist before using chaparral.




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Alfalfa
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Asafoetida
Betel Leaves
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Kalonji
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Mullien
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Tee Tree
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Tribulus
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All Information is provided for educational purposes only and not intended
to be used for any therapeutic purpose, neither is it intended to diagnose,
prevent, treat or cure any disease. Please consult a health care
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