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Herbs > Chamomile (anthemis nobilis)

Also know as chamomilla, Chamomile is an extremely popular herbal remedy, due to its wide range of applications and the safe nature of the herb.

Healing uses:
Chamomile tea can easily be made by putting 2-3 teaspoons of the dried flowers in a teapot and brewing like regular tea. This makes a soothing drink which provides mild relief from insomnia, relieves sore throats and is beneficial to menstruating women. It also eases colic, and is particularly effective for children and the elderly.

Adding chamomile tea to bath water will ease inflammation of the skin and soothe sunburn. For irritated skin and mild burns, a cold chamomile compress can be effective. Simmer 1 tablespoon of dried flowers in 500ml of water for 20-30 minutes. Refrigerate and when cool, soak a clean section of linen or gauze in the mixture. Apply the cloth to the affected area. The chamomile mixture used for the compress is not suitable for drinking.

Other uses:
Chamomile is often used in beauty preparations, particularly on fair hair. To highlight and add shine to fair hair, simmer 10g of chamomile flowers in 500ml of water for 20 minutes. Leave to cool and use the mixture as a final rinse when shampooing and conditioning. This can be left in the hair for a delicate perfume.

A chamomile shampoo is gentle and pleasantly fragrant. In a bowl, put 1 tablespoon of mild soapflakes (such as Lux), 1 tablespoon of borax, 10g of powdered chamomile flowers (use a mortar and pestle to powder them) and 500ml of hot water. Beat the ingredients, which will form a thick lather. Use this lather like a regular shampoo.

Cautions:
Chamomile is considered very safe, however, in very rare cases, as with comfrey, people have had severe allergic reactions resulting in anaphylactic shock. Exercise caution if you have never used chamomile previously.

Growing Chamomile:
Chamomile is a ground cover plant, and it makes an attractive and fragrant lawn. It is a hardy plant which actually flourishes when walked on. It will flower in its second year of growth, and it is these flowers which contain much of the medicinal value of the plant. They should be picked very delicately to prevent bruising (using tweezers is a good idea) after 2-3 rainless days, and allowed to dry.

If raising a lawn from seeds, they should be sewn in Spring on a very well weeded (preferably sieved) area of ground. However, it is much simpler to grow chamomile from root division – the splitting and transplanting of mature plants. It will spread and cover the ground abundantly.

Chamomile lawns can be mown, if desired. Simply set the lawn-mower blades slightly higher than you would for grass and proceed normally.

Planting chamomile alongside other plants will help keep them disease-free and deter flies and aphids.




Index
Quick Reference
Alfalfa
Aloe Vera
Arnica
Asafoetida
Betel Leaves
Bishop’s Weed
Blessed Thistle
Burcock
Cascara Sagrada
Cardamom
Chamomile
Chaparral
Chicory
Cinnamon
Comfrey
Coriander
Curry Leaves
Dandelion
Damiana
Echinacea
Euphrasia
Fenugreek
Garlic
Ayurvedic Garlic
Ginger
Aurvedic Ginger
Ginko Biloba
Ginseng
Gotu Kola
Guarana
Henna
Holy Basil
Hoodia Gordonii
Horny Goat Weed
Hyssop
Isapghula
Kalonji
Kava
Lavender
Liquorice
Mullien
Sage
Sandalwood
Sarsaparilla
St Johns Wort
Tee Tree
Thyme
Tribulus
Turmeric

 
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All Information is provided for educational purposes only and not intended
to be used for any therapeutic purpose, neither is it intended to diagnose,
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The Health Information Network does not accept any responsibility for any errors or omissions.

ęCopyright 2014 The Health Information Network