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Herbs > Cascara Sagrada (Rhamus Parshiana)

Also know as buckthorn or sacred bark, Cascara Sagrada is a shrub or tree which is native to North America. The bark is the active component of this plant. The fresh bark contains an emetic (vomit-inducing) quality which diminishes with storage or heat.

Healing uses:
Cascara Sagrada one of the most efficient herbs for relieving constipation. The most effective way to take cascara Sagrada is as a decoction. Cover 1-2 teaspoons of the dried bark with 1 cup of water. Bring to the boil, and allow to infuse for ten minutes. This decoction should prove to be an efficient laxative.

You will find that most health stores will have ready to use products containing Cascara Sagrada for the relief of constipation.

The decoction can discourage children and adults from biting their fingernails. Simply coat the nails with the liquid.

A slightly ber decoction can help fight herpes simplex, or cold sores. Boil 2 tablespoons of the dried bark in 1 litre of water for 10 minutes. Allow the mixture to stand for a further 30 minutes, then strain and refrigerate it. Three cups of this decoction should be drunk each day, as well as wiping the sores with a cotton ball soaked in the liquid. This is highly successful for driving the virus into remission and preventing sores from developing.

Cautions:
Excessive use may cause adverse reactions such vomiting and cramps.
Cascara Sagrada should never be consumed by pregnant or lactating women.
Individuals with peptic ulcers should avoid cascara Sagrada.

Growing cascara Sagrada:
Cascara Sagrada is often collected in the wild in North America, where it is a native plant. It can be cultivated from seed, which should be sown in Autumn. It prefers well-drained soil in sun or partial shade. The mature plant is a shrub or tree with a height of 3-12 metres. In late Winter or early Spring, the branches should be thinned and the dead wood removed. The bark can be harvested from even the young plants in Spring or early Summer. Care should be taken to remove only small amounts of bark from each plant, to ensure continuing growth. Dry the bark for at least one year before use to remove its emetic quality. Alternatively, if needed urgently the bark can be cooked in the oven at a temperature of 100░C for at least 2 hours.




Index
Quick Reference
Alfalfa
Aloe Vera
Arnica
Asafoetida
Betel Leaves
Bishop’s Weed
Blessed Thistle
Burcock
Cascara Sagrada
Cardamom
Chamomile
Chaparral
Chicory
Cinnamon
Comfrey
Coriander
Curry Leaves
Dandelion
Damiana
Echinacea
Euphrasia
Fenugreek
Garlic
Ayurvedic Garlic
Ginger
Aurvedic Ginger
Ginko Biloba
Ginseng
Gotu Kola
Guarana
Henna
Holy Basil
Hoodia Gordonii
Horny Goat Weed
Hyssop
Isapghula
Kalonji
Kava
Lavender
Liquorice
Mullien
Sage
Sandalwood
Sarsaparilla
St Johns Wort
Tee Tree
Thyme
Tribulus
Turmeric

 
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