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Herbs > Burdock (Arcticum Lappa)

Also known as: Lappa, beggar’s buttons, thorny burr and happy major, Arctium lappa is commonly called greater burdock, gobo, edible burdock, lappa, or beggar's buttons. It's a biennial plant of the Arctium (burdock) genus in the Asteraceae family, cultivated in gardens for its root used as a vegetable. It can also be an invasive weed in high-nitrogen soils.

Although its name suggests a relation to Docks, burdock is a member of the thistle family. Its most notable feature is its seed heads or burs, which attach themselves to animals and clothes.

Healing uses:

Burdock root is a medicinal herb and food that has powerful anti-tumor, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial properties.

Burdock root is one of the top recommended herbal remedies for cancer due to the belief that it can stop cancer cells from metastasizing and it is one of the star ingredients of the famous natural cancer remedy known as Essiac tea. It is also highly beneficial for colds, flu, sore throats, bronchial congestion, ulcers, gallstones, anemia, kidney stones, chicken pox, gout, measles, strep throat, urinary tract infections, bladder infections, hepatitis, and enlarged prostates.

Burdock is excellent for treating a wide range of skin problems, including eczema, acne, boils, psoriasis, styes and herpes.

Method; Bring 2 litres of water to the boil, and add 3 tablespoons of cut, dried burdock root.
Reduce the temperature and simmer for 7 minutes.
Remove from the heat, cover and allow to steep for 2 hours.
This can be drunk as a tea, and also used as a wash for the affected areas of the skin.
The tea works by cleansing sweat and oil gland from within, and so is excellent as a general detoxicant as well.

Regular consumption of this tea is also beneficial for easing constipation, reducing cholesterol and, as a mouthwash, healing mouth ulcers. Including an equal portion of dandelion root to the tea which ease pain associated with arthritis, gout and rheumatism.

A poultice of crushed or wet burdock leaves reduces the swelling of glands caused by colds and flu's. It is also effective for alleviate swelling associated with sprains.

Burdock can be used in combination with catnip to eliminate kidney stones and gallstones. This is a fairly involved process, but well worth it, as it will move even the most stubborn stones.

Method; Add 2 tablespoons of chopped root, either fresh or dried, to boiling water.
Cover and simmer for 10 minutes, then remove from the heat and add 3 teaspoons of chopped catnip.
Leave for 1 hour, then strain. Take in 1 cup doses, adding 1 teaspoon of lemon juice and 1/2 teaspoon of maple syrup to sweeten.
Drink the mixture very slowly, and follow with a teaspoon of pure olive oil 10 minutes later.
Repeat this three times daily until the stones are gone.
While undertaking this treatment, do not consume fried foods, refined carbohydrates or red meat.

Other uses:

As well as being a beneficial medicinal herb, burdock The young leaf-stalks can be cooked and used in the same way as celery. The roots can be used raw in salads, cooked like carrots or added to stir-fries.

Growing burdock:
Burdock can be grown from seed, which should be sown in Spring. It grows best in moist, alkaline soil in the sun. In favourable conditions, it will freely self-seed. The young leaf stalks should be gathered in Spring. The roots are harvested in Autumn and if being used for medicinal, rather than culinary, purposes, should be dried in a well-ventilated space.




Index
Quick Reference
Alfalfa
Aloe Vera
Arnica
Asafoetida
Betel Leaves
Bishop’s Weed
Blessed Thistle
Burcock
Cascara Sagrada
Cardamom
Chamomile
Chaparral
Chicory
Cinnamon
Comfrey
Coriander
Curry Leaves
Dandelion
Damiana
Echinacea
Euphrasia
Fenugreek
Garlic
Ayurvedic Garlic
Ginger
Aurvedic Ginger
Ginko Biloba
Ginseng
Gotu Kola
Guarana
Henna
Holy Basil
Hoodia Gordonii
Horny Goat Weed
Hyssop
Isapghula
Kalonji
Kava
Lavender
Liquorice
Mullien
Sage
Sandalwood
Sarsaparilla
St Johns Wort
Tee Tree
Thyme
Tribulus
Turmeric

 
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