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Poisons > Saccharin

Sweetness with a bitter after taste

An artificial sweetener, Saccharin was discovered and produced in 1878 by Constantin Fahlberg, a chemist working on coal tar derivatives at the Johns Hopkins University. He set off a chemical reaction between o-sulfobenzoic acid, phosphorus chloride and ammonia, by chance he tasted the resultant compound. The chemical names 2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazol-1,1,3-trione, Benzoic sulfimide and Ortho sulphobenzamide should be a warning that its not for human consumption. But it seems that adults like children just love tasting stuff.

Soon after its discovery, its use became widespread due to sugar shortages during World War I and its popularity soured during the 1960s and 1970s as people began to be more concerned about obesity. In between times there were links to it causing health problems and the risk was so great that in 1972, the USDA made an attempt to completely ban the substance. But big money prevailed and the product is in wide spread use today to sweeten products such as drinks, candies, cookies, medicines, and toothpaste.

Research has shown that Saccharin is not absorbed and metabolised by mammals, it is mostly excreted within 24 hours, but there have been links to kidney problems and the growth of bladder tumours.

Problems with saccharin and the USDA have not been resolved and Saccharin today is widely used and commonly manufactured by combining anthranilic acid (used among other things as a corrosive agent for metal) with nitrous acid, sulphur dioxide, chlorine, and ammonia; Chlorine and ammonia.

Despite all this, in 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency removed saccharin from its list of hazardous materials. According to the EPA’s decision, saccharin was removed “from the lists of hazardous constituents and commercial chemical products which are hazardous wastes when discarded or intended to be discarded.” In addition, the EPA amended its regulations under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) “to remove saccharin and its salts from the list of hazardous substances.”

Saccharin has effectively no food energy and is much sweeter than sucrose, but it has a bitter or metallic after taste, especially at high concentrations, but the greatest concern is its potential to cause and support the growth of cancers.

The bottom line; If you must have sweets, eat sugar.

References
Wikipedia
Chemical safety
Weight gain with saccharin and aspartame, compared with sucrose, induce greater weight gain in adult Wistar rats, at similar total caloric intake levels.




 

Poisons Index
Aluminium
Asbestos
Common Toxins
Estrogens
Fluoride
 
A mind control drug  
Milk
 A1 & 2 Milk
 Milk and Ostorporosis
Genetically Engineered Foods
 
GE Corn in NZ
  GMO Corn Failure

Mercury
Parabens
Plastics
Radiation
Sweeteners
  Aspartame
  Nectresse
  Saccharin
  Splenda
  Sugar- a sweet poison
  Sodium Laurel Sulphate
Trans Fatty Acids

 
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