The Health Information Network

Education - Business - Product & Service Reviews
Mobile friendly site

travel
The Travel Guide
 Your Health
 Home Page
 Product Reviews
Understanding health
 Men's health
    Libido & Penis health
  Women's health
   Breast health
    Reproductive health
  Body and Self
    Anatomy
  Books
 Common Diseases
 Environment
    Act Local, Think Global
    Agriculture
    Our foods
    Poisons
 Skin Care
 Sleep
 Sociology
  Psychology
  Relationships
Healing systems
  Ayurveda
  Dental health
  Diet & Nutrition

    Our foods
    Carbohydrates
    Herbs
    Proteins

  Drugs
  Massage
  Minerals
  Spiritual Healing
  Tantra
  Tarot
  Vitamins
  Wisdom
  Animal Health


Links
  Business Directory
  Dating
  Holistic Bodywork Manuals
  Humour
  Learn Massage
  New Zealand Gift Ideas
  Travel

 
Natural
Breast
Enhancement


































 
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
 

Drugs > Other Drugs

PCP is sometimes considered a hallucinogen because it has some of the same effects. However, it does not fit easily into any one drug category. Because PCP is made under non-quality controlled circumstances and is associated with extremely bizarre and aggressive acts, it is considered the most unpredictable drug. It is frequently sprinkled on to marijuana to intensify the effect. This is referred to as "killer weed".

Peyote
Comes from the peyote cactus and although not as strong as LSD, its effects are similar. Mescaline is smoked or swallowed in capsule form or as tablets. The trip is longer, but has a slower onset and traditionally associated with shaman.

Psilocybin
Comes form certain mushrooms. It is sold in tablet or capsule form. The mushrooms themselves are eaten, fresh or dried. The trip has an intense euphoric stage but is short in duration and traditionally associated with shaman.

DMT
Another psychedelic drug that acts like LSD. Its effects begin almost immediately and last for 30-60 minutes.

Datura
Of all the natural hallucinogens, Datura is responsible for the most deaths.

Also known as Jimson Wood, or Thornapple Tree, datura is a member of the nightshade family and is a popular garden specimen tree with displays of red or white, trumpet shaped flowers, the red flowers being more toxic. The flower has a sweet heady smell and is more potent when picked at night. The seeds, flowers and leaves are all toxic. These are boiled up and leave a liquid which looks like muddy water, but smells like cabbage water which is then taken by mouth.

Effects
  • Excessive thirst as a result of massive dehydration
  • Convulsions, coma and death
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dilated pupils
  • Flushing/chills
  • Dry mouth
  • Nausea
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Delirium
  • Colour distortion
  • Numbed hearing
  • Hallucinations
  • Delusions
  • Amnesis (black out)

Consequences
Experiences can be violent. Drowning can occur as a result of wanting to quench thirst and alleviate fever. Disorientation and hallucinations result in person having no idea what they are doing. Kidney damage and /or kidney failure may occur as a result of the strong diuretic effect. The effects can last 6-10 hours, but have been known to last several days. The following day after the initial effects have worn off the following problems may occur.

  • Loss of eye focus
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Fear
  • Paranoia
  • Panic

Datura taken in conjunction with marijuana, can display behaviour may be that of a person on a LSD trip.





 

Drugs Index
Methanphtamine
LSD
Other Drugs
 

 
Advertising
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer


Learn Massage


Grow Your
Own Breasts

Naturally




Weight-loss
Products
Reviewed


Fishpond


Top

Disclaimer:
All Information is provided for educational purposes only and not intended
to be used for any therapeutic purpose, neither is it intended to diagnose,
prevent, treat or cure any disease. Please consult a health care
professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
While attempts have been made to ensure the accuracy of this information,
The Health Information Network does not accept any responsibility for any errors or omissions.

ęCopyright 2014 The Health Information Network